Tag Archives: Census Bureau

Census 2020 – Making Idaho Count

Across Idaho, county commissioners, mayors, tribal leaders, nonprofit representatives and other civic leaders are urging Idahoans to stand up and be counted in the 2020 Census. They are well aware of the importance of ensuring that every member in their communities. A lot depends on it.

WHY ANSWER THE CENSUS?

Political clout.
A main purpose of the census is to count how many people live in each state, which determines how many members of the U.S. House of Representatives that state has. In the neighboring state of Montana, leaders are especially concerned about counting their total population this year, because the results could give Montana a second member of the House. If Idaho’s population continues to grow at its current strong rate, it’s very likely to get a third House member 10 years from now based on the 2030 Census.

The Census numbers also are used to determine the size of legislative districts within the state. It makes sure that areas get a fair share of political representation relative to population size.

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All of Idaho Benefits When Businesses Answer the Economic Census

Think your business doesn’t need to answer the Five-Year Economic Census? Think again.

Imagine trying to secure a bank loan, develop a strategic business plan or land a good company for your small town with no data to back up your proposal.

What many businesses and organizations don’t know is much of the information they used to land lucrative contracts or lure good, high-paying jobs to their areas comes from the Economic Census – a key source of statistics and information about business and industry.

Issued once every five years (for years ending in 2 and 7), the economic census is currently underway for 2017 and is the first time the entire survey will be conducted almost entirely online via a secure portal.

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Employee Turnover: Why And At What Cost?

statewide turnover rate

Employee turnover in Idaho slowed during the recession but is beginning to pick up again as workers become more comfortable in a reviving labor market. But the rate of turnover and characteristics of the workers changing jobs can have a significant economic impact on businesses.

Employees stay on the job an average of 23 to 24 months before jumping ship or being laid off, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ labor turnover survey, and at a cost that can substantially affect a business’s bottom line.

According to the Census Bureau’s Quarterly Workforce Indicators, employee turnover was 9.1 percent for all jobs in 2011. That is up from 8.8 percent in the depths of the recession in 2009 but still below prerecession levels approaching 11 percent.

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