Tag Archives: job seeker

Around Idaho: June Economic Activity

Information provided in this article has been gathered from various sources throughout the state, including professional sources, news releases, weekly and daily newspapers, television and other media.

Statewide
Northern Idaho
North Central Idaho
Southwestern Idaho
South Central Idaho
Southeastern Idaho
Eastern Idaho

STATEWIDE

  • The number of housing units in Idaho increased by 6,000 between July 2013 and July 2014. While about a quarter of the state’s housing units are in Ada County, nearly 3,000 of the new units were built in the county, representing about half of the growth of new housing units in the state. (From Boise State Public Radio)

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Workforce Program Gives Grangeville Woman Confidence

rebekah-gulottaI was desperate for work when I contacted the Grangeville Idaho Department of Labor office over a year ago. I had been volunteering at a camp all summer and it had been more than six months since I had a ‘paying job.’ My family had just moved to town and I had applied to several places for work for a couple months with no results.

I met my new workforce consultant, Nicolle Long, for an ‘interview’ where we talked about my past experiences, what my goals were and what kind of job I was looking for. Soon after I was accepted in the Workforce Investment Act program, I received a call about a job possibility at my local library and we scheduled an interview.  It went well and I started working about a week later. It was a great fit! Not only did the department find me a part-time job, but the Labor staff helped me step into a second part-time job a couple months later!

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Career Information is For Adults Too

Idaho’s Career Information System is not just for kids. The free, customized online tool also helps adults stay on a solid path toward a successful future while they are in school, training or pursuing a new career.

AdultCISUser copyStudents and adults with career plans are more likely to stay in school, pursue a higher education and once they enter the world of work, see greater promotional opportunities. Accessing Idaho’s Career Information System is free and can help both parents and children:

  • Understand how interests and strengths connect to the world of work
  • Define a career path
  • Decide areas of study to pursue in middle/junior high, high school and college
  • Find the training, education, knowledge – and money – necessary for following their dreams.

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Putting the Job Search Puzzle Together

Kevin Mansfield believes he has been under-employed since moving from California to Idaho nearly five years ago. He worked as a private investigator for the past 12 years, traveling all over the West when assignments came in, expending a lot of personal money just to work a case and then waiting two to three weeks to get paid.  While the pay was good, the work was sporadic.

After being randomly selected for an Idaho Department of Labor job search assessment as an unemployment claimant, Kevin was required to attend a class outlining what services were available from the Labor Department and how to look for work.

“The guy who taught the class was fabulous (Frank Garcia), said Kevin. “He obviously had to deal with  ‘students’ who could have cared less about being there and were just going through the motions because if they didn’t show, they would lose their UI benefits.”

“I was engaged and asked a lot of questions. I really wanted a different life,” Kevin said. After  class, Kevin had a discussion with Frank, who recommended that Kevin talk to the local veterans representative.

Kevin was told about VRAP (Veterans Retraining Assistance Program), which pays a monthly stipend for education in a critical career. He was accepted into the program and began school at North Idaho College as a medical billing specialist with an emphasis in medical coding. Kevin said it was important that the majority of the classes were online, so he could continue to work as a private investigator.

Kevin was told about a new-hire program at Kootenai Health for medical coding students. “In a nutshell, they were going to pay for the training and for me to continue to go to school full time,” Kevin said. He was one of 13 selected for the program for the fall semester.

According to Kevin, there were “two critical pieces of the puzzle pieces coming together” to get him on the way to his new career.

  • “I learned about the VRAP program and everything started to come together after that.”
  • “The people involved all took an active, interested look at my circumstances and we came up with a plan.”

Older Job Seeker Triumphs by Changing How She Conducted Job Search

Lory Brager was laid off seven months ago as a human resources manager for a large Idaho company when it reorganized. It was the second time she had been laid off due to the economy.

Lory1“The first time this happened to me in 2009, I felt so humiliated,” Lory said. “That feeling held me back from doing what had to be done. It was just as painful this time, but I made up my mind to do things differently. This time I was not going to feel like a victim.”

Lory immediately took all of the job search classes available in her area. She targeted her resume for each position for which she applied. Each cover letter was written as a ‘value proposition,’ indicating what she could do for the company.

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Focusing on Skills, Knowledge Helps Elicia Johnson Land a Job

Elicia Johnson was so grateful for the job search assistance she received from Boise workforce consultant, Alma Welch, she kept her appointment even after she had accepted an offer just so she could tell Alma thank you.keyboard typing hands

Elicia first met Alma after being randomly selected for an Idaho Department of Labor job search assessment as an unemployment claimant. She had lost her job as an office manager after working with the same company for 23 years.

Alma gave Elicia an overview of the department’s services, discussed her job search progress and recommended resume and job search workshops.

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FAQ Friday – Do I have to look for work while receiving unemployment benefits?

Here are some quick answers to questions about unemployment insurance benefits:

Do I have to seek work each week?

It depends. You MUST comply with the work-seeking require ments you received when you filed your claim. You will be required to either contact employers in your labor market each week that hire people for the type of work you are seeking or maintain contact with the employer for whom you are returning to work.

You must keep track of your work search including employers, their addresses and phone numbers, dates and names of contacts, method of contact, the type of work you sought and results of the contact.

A work search record form is available on the Labor website

What is a valid work search contact?

Your obligation while receiving unemployment benefits is to become re-employed, and you should develop a realistic plan to achieve this objective. Unless otherwise specified in your work search plan, you are required to make a good faith effort to seek full-time work each week that you claim benefits, even if you are employed part time.

Unless otherwise specified in your work search plan, you must make at least two contacts per week while you are receiving benefits or you may be denied those benefits. You can make a contact online, in person, by mail, email or over the phone.

All contacts must be made with a person who has hiring authority, and written applications must be filed where accepted. A friend or relative who works for the company you are applying for is not a valid contact.

Contacts must be for wage work. Self-employment or independent contract work contacts are not valid. The same employer(s) may not be used for required contacts in consecutive weeks.

An online contact is only valid if it results in an online application being completed or a résumé being submitted. Simply searching websites such as careerbuilder.com or monster.com is not valid.

You may find our Valid Work Search Contact publication helpful.

How will I know if I am required to look for work?

Unless otherwise specified, you are required to look for work. If you are asked, ‘Did you look for work as agreed to in your work search plan?’ on your weekly report, you are required to make at least two contacts per week. Never assume that you are not required to look for work. Call your us at (208) 332-8942 if you have questions regarding your work search requirements.

How can the Idaho Department of Labor help me find a job?

Help is available at no charge at any of our 25 Department of Labor offices or you can access our job information on the Labor website. Workshops on resume writing, interviewing and more are available. Check the calendar for specific dates.