Tag Archives: looking for work

Labor Programs Help Youth Looking for Work

The Idaho Department of Labor has many youth services available to help young people who are starting to think about their future and where they want to work.

It’s not too late to go after the summer job you want, and people in your local Department of Labor office can be a big help. They’ll show you how to put a good resume together, even if you don’t have much or any past work experience. Since they work with employers every day, they know what the people who do the hiring look for in an applicant, and they know that things like dressing for interviews and being on time can be just as important as anything you say during an interview. Call the office, ask for an appointment with a workforce consultant and take advantage of her expertise.

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How do I Stay Eligible for Unemployment Insurance Benefits?

Note: This blog post was updated Nov. 23, 2016, with new information throughout the article.

To stay eligible for unemployment insurance benefits once you have applied for benefits, you must complete a weekly certification at labor.idaho.gov/claimantportal. Click here for instructions. You must also be working less than full time, be available and physically and mentally able to work and actively seeking full-time employment. You also must be willing and able to work all the days and hours normal for the type of work you seek. Finally, you need to remain in the area unless you are seeking work outside of where you live.

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Career Information is For Adults Too

Idaho’s Career Information System is not just for kids. The free, customized online tool also helps adults stay on a solid path toward a successful future while they are in school, training or pursuing a new career.

AdultCISUser copyStudents and adults with career plans are more likely to stay in school, pursue a higher education and once they enter the world of work, see greater promotional opportunities. Accessing Idaho’s Career Information System is free and can help both parents and children:

  • Understand how interests and strengths connect to the world of work
  • Define a career path
  • Decide areas of study to pursue in middle/junior high, high school and college
  • Find the training, education, knowledge – and money – necessary for following their dreams.

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FAQ Friday – Do I have to look for work while receiving unemployment benefits?

Here are some quick answers to questions about unemployment insurance benefits:

Do I have to seek work each week?

It depends. You MUST comply with the work-seeking require ments you received when you filed your claim. You will be required to either contact employers in your labor market each week that hire people for the type of work you are seeking or maintain contact with the employer for whom you are returning to work.

You must keep track of your work search including employers, their addresses and phone numbers, dates and names of contacts, method of contact, the type of work you sought and results of the contact.

A work search record form is available on the Labor website

What is a valid work search contact?

Your obligation while receiving unemployment benefits is to become re-employed, and you should develop a realistic plan to achieve this objective. Unless otherwise specified in your work search plan, you are required to make a good faith effort to seek full-time work each week that you claim benefits, even if you are employed part time.

Unless otherwise specified in your work search plan, you must make at least two contacts per week while you are receiving benefits or you may be denied those benefits. You can make a contact online, in person, by mail, email or over the phone.

All contacts must be made with a person who has hiring authority, and written applications must be filed where accepted. A friend or relative who works for the company you are applying for is not a valid contact.

Contacts must be for wage work. Self-employment or independent contract work contacts are not valid. The same employer(s) may not be used for required contacts in consecutive weeks.

An online contact is only valid if it results in an online application being completed or a résumé being submitted. Simply searching websites such as careerbuilder.com or monster.com is not valid.

You may find our Valid Work Search Contact publication helpful.

How will I know if I am required to look for work?

Unless otherwise specified, you are required to look for work. If you are asked, ‘Did you look for work as agreed to in your work search plan?’ on your weekly report, you are required to make at least two contacts per week. Never assume that you are not required to look for work. Call your us at (208) 332-8942 if you have questions regarding your work search requirements.

How can the Idaho Department of Labor help me find a job?

Help is available at no charge at any of our 25 Department of Labor offices or you can access our job information on the Labor website. Workshops on resume writing, interviewing and more are available. Check the calendar for specific dates.

FAQ Friday – What do I do when I can’t get an interview?

Sometimes the answer may be simply that there are many applicants to choose from. Remember there are a lot of employers out there and maybe getting an entry level job elsewhere could help you get a job with their perfect employer at a higher level in the future. In the meantime…Computrol

Get a Second Opinion on how you present yourself to prospective employers in a résumé, cover letter or in person. Ask an Idaho Department of Labor consultant to review these items and how you can better portray yourself to the employer.

Can YOU Read Your Writing? Was your application legible? Some company hiring managers won’t even consider you if they can’t read your writing. Did you fail to complete your application, explain your strong skills, abilities, and training or education? Did you go to the office on Monday, the busiest day of the week, or at closing time? Try a mock “turn in your application” the exact way you did with the last company you visited, and do it with someone who will give you some feedback. You may discover some issues you haven’t thought of before. Make sure everything is filled in on the application, and if the subject doesn’t pertain, a simple (n/a) is adequate, but don’t leave it blank.

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