Tag Archives: teens

Teens: You May Already Have Valuable Job Skills

You’ve probably heard of “soft skills” – abilities employers look for in all workers. But did you know  you probably already possess a lot of solid, job-related skills  you’ll rely on when you’re working for a living?

4clipboardFor example, if you’ve ever figured out the price of a CD at 15 percent off, then you have math skills that can help you understand payroll deductions like state and federal taxes. Math skills are helpful for understanding your own paycheck and investments as well as for jobs in personnel, finance and management.

Have you ever taught a friend the rules of a sport or game they’ve never played? If you have, you might have the makings of a good trainer – someone who teaches employees company rules and policies, as well as new skills that will help them advance in the company.

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Career Information is For Adults Too

Idaho’s Career Information System is not just for kids. The free, customized online tool also helps adults stay on a solid path toward a successful future while they are in school, training or pursuing a new career.

AdultCISUser copyStudents and adults with career plans are more likely to stay in school, pursue a higher education and once they enter the world of work, see greater promotional opportunities. Accessing Idaho’s Career Information System is free and can help both parents and children:

  • Understand how interests and strengths connect to the world of work
  • Define a career path
  • Decide areas of study to pursue in middle/junior high, high school and college
  • Find the training, education, knowledge – and money – necessary for following their dreams.

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Workshop Helps Youth Learn Why Soft Skills are Important

Employers have been increasingly voicing concerns about job applicants – especially young ones – having basic job skills – what’s called soft skills.

The Idaho Department of Labor took up their cause recently with a workshop in Pocatello to help young people, typically first-time job seekers, find work. And a major focus was on the following soft skills:

  • Showing up for work on time
  •  Proper dress and grooming
  •  Working well with others
  •  Showing initiative
  •  The ability to follow directions
  •  Strong written and verbal communication skills
  • Being polite
Stacy Miller, Mary Johnson and Kim Smith talk about why soft skills are important to employers.

Stacy Miller, Mary Johnson and Kim Smith discuss why soft skills are important to employers.

“Soft skills are one of the key factors which can move a young person from being a job seeker to an employee,” department Regional Economist Dan Cravens told the 30 people who took part in the workshop. “We had many employers and parents in the area request that we do a workshop like this so that local youth can better understand how they need to act in order to find a job, and do well at it.”

Many of the 16-to-24-year-olds face the same challenges young people across the country face – unemployment rates over 16 percent. Unemployment rates would probably be higher for this age group, but too many young job seekers have just given up hope of finding work.
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Tips for Teens: Applying for that First Job

Landing a first job can be difficult for a teen since employers often look for experience when making a hire.

But Hope Keller, workforce consultant for the Idaho Department of Labor’s Orofino office, offered up these tips to make the job search easier for teens.

What resume tips do you have for teens?

Workforce consultant Hope Keller

Workforce consultant Hope Keller

Don’t sell yourself short.  Write down all the activities you are involved in (school, volunteer, sports), as well as “spot” jobs such as babysitting, housecleaning, yard work and family jobs like ranching.

Next, write down all your skills and separate them into two categories “technical” skills and “soft skills” and highlight both. Employers often look for a combination of both.

Don’t overlook your soft skills. For example, if you play sports you learned teamwork, communication, the ability to follow directions and the ability to prioritize and multitask. Sports also teach transferrable technical skills such as physical fitness and hand-eye coordination.

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FAQ Friday – How old does a minor have to be to work?

Now that school is almost over teens are beginning to think about summer jobs. Make sure you know what age requirements exist for a particular job before your child applies. icecream_job

Age 14 is listed by the Fair Labor Standards Act as the minimum age for most non-agricultural work. However, at any age, youth may deliver newspapers; perform in radio, television movie, or theatrical productions; work in businesses owned by their parents (except in mining, manufacturing or hazardous jobs); and perform babysitting or minor chores around a private home.
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