Tag Archives: census

Idaho Cities Continue Strong Population Growth in 2019

NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release: June 1, 2020
Media Contact: Kathryn Tacke, (208) 799-5000 ext. 3984 or Craig Shaul, (208) 332-3570 ext. 3201

The population increase of Twin Falls from 2018-2019 passed a milestone, making it the eighth city in Idaho to have more than 50,000 residents, according to data recently released by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Idaho’s cities continue to be magnets drawing population from outside the state and from Idaho’s rural areas. Population in Idaho’s 200 incorporated cities grew 2.3 percent between 2018 and 2019, faster than the state’s 2.1 percent.

Two Idaho cities — Boise and Meridian — had more than 100,000 residents in 2019, while Nampa’s 2019 population was shy of 100,000 by 3,064 residents.

Meridian added the most population in Idaho between 2018 and 2019, adding 7,697 residents, while Nampa added 3,064 and Caldwell added 2,003.

Continue reading

Idaho Cities Continue Strong Population Growth in 2019, Housing Growth Lags

Recent population estimates for 2019 show Idaho’s cities in general have been thriving although small towns in many rural areas have not shared in the growth.

The data recently released by the  U.S. Census Bureau shows the population living in Idaho’s 200 incorporated cities grew 2.3 percent from 2018-2019, faster than the state’s 2.1 percent growth.

The bureau also released housing unit growth across the state, which also grew 2.1 percent for the year.

Population Changes 2018-2019

Meridian added the most population in Idaho between 2018 and 2019, adding 7,697 residents, while Nampa added 3,064 and Caldwell added 2,003. Boise and Meridian were the only two cities with more than 100,000 residents, though Nampa was not far behind with just 3,064 residents fewer than 100,000.

Continue reading

Census Provides Snapshots of Idaho’s Reservation Populations

In the early 1980s, two economic consultants presented information about the 1980 Census to professors and students in the economics department at the University of Idaho. They excitedly announced that the Nez Perce were one of the richest tribes in the United States with extremely low poverty and unemployment rates. The audience was stunned. That did not jive with what they knew. Then, someone asked the key question, “Did you use data for the tribe or the reservation?” The consultants said the reservation, which they thought was the same as the tribe. But they were wrong. While the Nez Perce Reservation had a population of roughly 17,800 in 1980, only about 1,500 residents were Native American.

The Dawes Act of 1887 led to a large number of white settlers buying land from tribal members throughout the West. As a consequence, Native Americans make up only 26 percent of the residents living on Idaho reservations. The following table shows the total and Native American  populations of Idaho’s five reservations, and that the Native American  population has been growing faster than the total population on the reservations.

Continue reading

Idaho Census Data Changes Over the Decades

The 1870 Census found 14,999 people living in the Territory of Idaho. Ten years later, that grew to 32,610 people. In 1890, the year Idaho became a state, it had 88,548 residents. Its population nearly doubled by 1900 and then more than doubled to 325,594 in 1910.

Population grew more slowly in the next 10 years reaching 431,866. Despite the Depression, Idaho’s population rose to 524,873 by 1940. Over the next three decades, Idaho’s population grew an average 14 percent per decade, reaching 667,191 in 1960. Growth slowed to 7 percent in the next decade. The economic prosperity of the 1970s helped Idaho grow an impressive 32 percent, from 712, 567 to 943,935. The double-dip recession of the early 1980s hit Idaho hard, resulting in only 7 percent growth. By 1990, Idaho had more than a million residents. The next two decades brought strong growth — 29 percent to 1,293,953 people in 2000 and 21 percent to 1,567,582 by 2010.

Continue reading

Census 2020 – Making Idaho Count

Across Idaho, county commissioners, mayors, tribal leaders, nonprofit representatives and other civic leaders are urging Idahoans to stand up and be counted in the 2020 Census. They are well aware of the importance of ensuring that every member in their communities. A lot depends on it.

WHY ANSWER THE CENSUS?

Political clout.
A main purpose of the census is to count how many people live in each state, which determines how many members of the U.S. House of Representatives that state has. In the neighboring state of Montana, leaders are especially concerned about counting their total population this year, because the results could give Montana a second member of the House. If Idaho’s population continues to grow at its current strong rate, it’s very likely to get a third House member 10 years from now based on the 2030 Census.

The Census numbers also are used to determine the size of legislative districts within the state. It makes sure that areas get a fair share of political representation relative to population size.

Continue reading

Idaho Population Shift from Rural to Urban Counties Continued in 2018

In-Migration Accounted for 73 Percent of Idaho’s Population Increase

Idaho’s population continued to become more urbanized from mid-2017 to mid-2018, with nearly 73 percent of the growth coming from outside the state, newly released data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows. The data provides additional detail at the county level to the January release that showed Idaho’s 2.1 percent population increase tied with Nevada as the fastest-growing state in the nation.

The Boise Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) population grew by 2.9 percent – the eighth fastest among the nation’s 383 other MSAs. The five counties that comprise the Boise MSA – Ada, Boise, Canyon, Gem and Owyhee counties – increased by 20,346 people accounting for 58 percent of the state’s total increase of 35,304. The concentration of more than half of Idaho’s growth in the Boise MSA typifies the continued steady shift toward urbanization of the state’s population from rural to urban counties.

Continue reading

Idaho Age Groups Show Significant Change in 2017

NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release: July 10, 2018
Information Contact: Janell Hyer, (208) 332-3570 ext. 3220

The number of Idaho seniors – people age 65 and older – grew nearly 8 percent from mid-2016 to mid-2017, the highest percentage increase of all age groups. Overall the state experienced a significant population increase of nearly 37,000 or 2.2 percent across all age groups for the same time period, according to estimates recently released by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Continue reading

Meridian Ranked 10th Nationally for Population Growth in 2017

NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release: May 24, 2018
Information Contact: Janell Hyer (208) 332-3570 ext. 3220 or Georgia Smith (208) 332-3570 ext. 2102

Meridian was ranked the 10th fastest growing city in the nation at 4.7 percent growth in 2017, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s population estimates released Thursday. That’s up from 13th in 2016.

Meridian was also Idaho’s fastest-growing city with a population increase of 4,490 and it continues to be the second largest city in the state for the third year with a population of 99,926.

Boise remains the largest city with a population of 226,570.

Continue reading

Fewer Workplace Deaths in Idaho in 2016

Thirty work-related deaths were recorded in Idaho in 2016, down from 36 in 2015, while nationally there was an increase of 7.3 percent from 4,836 in 2015 to 5,190 in 2016.

Over the past 14 years, the leading cause of deaths in the workplace occurred in the transportation industry and transportation-related incidents in either agricultural and forestry industries. The second leading cause involves contact with objects and equipment and exposure to toxic substances. Less frequently, deaths results from violence in the workplace (Chart 1). Continue reading

Educated People Moving to Idaho, Growth Concentrated in Cities

Migration into Idaho is, in some ways, a study of contrasts. While Idaho ranks 16th in the nation for state-to-state migration of people over 25 years old, 99 percent of that migration is into the Boise metro area. In 2014, 3,104 adults moved from another state into Idaho of which 3,066 moved to one of the six counties that encompass Idaho’s Treasure Valley. The only other places in Idaho that saw a positive flow from outside of the state were Coeur d’Alene (Kootenai County) and the Magic Valley, though still low. Because the Lewiston metro area straddles the state line, it was excluded from this analysis which examined only state-to-state and metro-to-state flows.1-Net-I_state-Migration

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

2-Idaho-Interstate-Gain_LossSource: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

Most adults moving into Idaho had a high school diploma but no college experience nor a post-secondary degree. In fact, for every one adult with a bachelor’s degree or higher who moved in, five adults with no more than a high school diploma moved into Idaho at the same time. This ratio improves with adults who had some college experience or an associate’s degree; for each one of these adults who moved into the state, two with no more than a high school diploma also moved in.

Continue reading