Tag Archives: FAQs

New IdahoWorks FAQ for Job Seekers

The Idaho Department of Labor is launching a new IdahoWorks on Monday, June 15. IdahoWorks is the free online system job seekers use to find jobs, create resumes and profiles that can be matched to employers and career exploration options. ​

In order to launch the new system, the job search, job posting and the unemployment insurance systems will be temporarily unavailable starting at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 10 until 7 a.m. Monday, June 15. Read our FAQs for unemployment insurance claimants for more information on how the downtime affects the filing process.

Q. What is the new IdahoWorks?

A. It is a user-friendly Web-based workforce development system that connects job seekers to jobs, employers to qualified talent and workforce professionals to tools that improve efficiency and employment outcomes. It is powered by the America’s Job Link Alliance. Continue reading

New IdahoWorks FAQ for Employers

Beginning in mid-June 2015, the Idaho Department of Labor is launching a new IdahoWorks, the free online system businesses use to post jobs and recruit workers. ​As the launch date nears, more information will be added to this list, so please check back often.

In order to launch the new system, the job search, job posting and the unemployment insurance systems will be temporarily unavailable starting at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 10 until 7 a.m. Monday, June 15. 

Q. What is the new IdahoWorks?

A. It is a user-friendly Web-based workforce development system that connects job seekers to jobs, employers to qualified talent and workforce professionals to tools that improve efficiency and employment outcomes. It is powered by the America’s Job Link Alliance. Continue reading

FAQ Friday – Unemployment extensions are ending. What can I do to prepare?

A: You are correct; extended unemployment insurance benefits are scheduled to end December 30, 2012, which means no more extended benefit payments each week.

Job fairs are only one of several free services offered by 25 Labor offices located throughout the state. This photo is from a job fair held this fall at the Idaho Center in Nampa.

We all know winter is a tough time to be looking for work in Idaho, which is why now is a good time to take advantage of the many Labor services available to help you find a job:

  • Résumés that highlight your skills, knowledge and abilities;
  • Training resources to help upgrade your skills;
  • Job interview assistance including how to organize your thoughts and present yourself as a strong, confident candidate;
  • Answering difficult questions about your work history;
  • Overcoming barriers you think may be preventing you from getting hired; and
  • Using social media to network your way into your next job.

All of these services and more – like job clubs, professional networking groups and every workshop we offer – are available to the public at no cost.

Yes, a good job can still be hard to find in today’s economy, but we see new job listings every day, so give us a call or visit your nearest local office.

FAQ Friday – Why do I have to wait a week to receive unemployment insurance benefits?

Everyone who files for unemployment insurance in Idaho is required to serve one waiting week and will not receive benefits for that week.

A waiting week reflects an unpaid week when you successfully file your weekly report and meet all the eligibility requirements for receiving unemployment insurance.

People who file for unemployment insurance are required to serve only one waiting week per benefit year, which is a calendar year from the date you file your claim. Once you serve your waiting week – even if you are laid off several times a year – you won’t serve a waiting week each time.

Sometimes people hear the ‘waiting week’ and think that means they are supposed to wait a week until filing their initial claim or a weekly report. Help us abolish this myth and DO NOT WAIT to file. If you don’t file, your waiting week is not counted as served and will only further delay the date you receive a benefit payment.

It is possible to work a partial week and still have that count toward your waiting week, however if you earn more than 1½ times your weekly benefit amount, that week does not qualify as a waiting week.  If this happens, the next week reported on your claim that meets all eligibility requirements will be counted as your waiting week.

Why is there such a thing as a waiting week? One reason was to reduce costs of the program or restore stability to a depleted UI trust fund.  Another reason is to provide administrative convenience.  Some states, such as Wisconsin and Kentucky have adopted a waiting week just within the last few years. Most states do not have waiting periods over one week.

FAQ Friday – How does the Idaho Department of Labor recover money from illegal claims?

People who claim benefits when they aren’t eligible are required to repay any and all overpayments in full, with a penalty assessed if the overpayment was due to fraud.

The department is very aggressive about collecting overpayments. If the claimant is employed, the department will garnish their wages. Yes – this means their new employers will discover they owe us money.

Other steps include garnishing the spouse’s wages, filing an administrative lien on personal property such as vehicles or private property, and seizing bank accounts and tax refunds.

Collection activity is a lot of work, but worth the investment. Allowing improperly paid benefits to stay uncollected isn’t fair to the many unemployed people who play by the rules. Collection efforts also help prevent employers from paying unnecessary taxes for benefits.

Bottom line: Collecting benefits when you shouldn’t isn’t worth the pain of having to pay them back ─ with penalties and interest.

FAQ Friday – What about working for a temp agency?

Q: I’m looking for work and recently interviewed with a temp agency.  I haven’t heard back yet, but my concern is if I take a temp job and it doesn’t lead to a permanent position, will I lose my unemployment benefits?

Answer: It depends. If you interview, are offered and accept a temporary position, work at it and are laid off due to lack of work, you still qualify for unemployment insurance benefits and can reopen your existing claim. If you interview and are A.) offered a job and refuse; or B.) accept, work at it, get fired or quit, an eligibility review is necessary to determine whether you still qualify to receive benefits.